Through this quickstart guide, you will explore Snowpark Container Services, which are now in Public Preview on AWS. You will learn the basic mechanics of working with Snowpark Container Services and build several introductory services. Please note: this quickstart assumes some existing knowledge and familiarity with containerization (e.g. Docker) and basic familiarity with container orchestration.

What is Snowpark Container Services?

Snowpark Container Service

Snowpark Container Services is a fully managed container offering that allows you to easily deploy, manage, and scale containerized services, jobs, and functions, all within the security and governance boundaries of Snowflake, and requiring zero data movement. As a fully managed service, SPCS comes with Snowflake's native security, RBAC support, and built-in configuration and operational best-practices.

Snowpark Container Services are fully integrated with both Snowflake features and third-party tools, such as Snowflake Virtual Warehouses and Docker, allowing teams to focus on building data applications, and not building or managing infrastructure. Just like all things Snowflake, this managed service allows you to run and scale your container workloads across regions and clouds without the additional complexity of managing a control plane, worker nodes, and also while having quick and easy access to your Snowflake data.

The introduction of Snowpark Container Services on Snowflake includes the incorporation of new object types and constructs to the Snowflake platform, namely: images, image registry, image repositories, compute pools, specification files, services, and jobs.

Development to Deployment

For more information on these objects, check out this article along with the Snowpark Container Services documentation.

How are customers and partners using Snowpark Container Services today? Containerized services on Snowflake open up the opportunity to host and run long-running services, like front-end web applications, all natively within your Snowflake environment. Customers are now running GPU-enabled machine learning and AI workloads, such as GPU-accelerated model training and open-source Large Language Models (LLMs) as jobs and as service functions, including fine-tuning of these LLMs on your own Snowflake data, without having to move the data to external compute infrastructure. Snowpark Container Services are an excellent path for deploying applications and services that are tightly coupled to the Data Cloud.

Note that while in this quickstart, we will predominantly use the direct SQL commands to interact with Snowpark Container Services and their associated objects, there is also Python API support in Public Preview that you can also use. Refer to the documentation for more info.

What you will learn

Prerequisites

What You'll Build

Run the following SQL commands in 00_setup.sql using the Snowflake VSCode Extension OR in a SQL worksheet to create the role, database, warehouse, and stage that we need to get started:

// Create an CONTAINER_USER_ROLE with required privileges
USE ROLE ACCOUNTADMIN;
CREATE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
GRANT CREATE DATABASE ON ACCOUNT TO ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
GRANT CREATE WAREHOUSE ON ACCOUNT TO ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
GRANT CREATE COMPUTE POOL ON ACCOUNT TO ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
GRANT CREATE INTEGRATION ON ACCOUNT TO ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
GRANT MONITOR USAGE ON ACCOUNT TO  ROLE  CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
GRANT BIND SERVICE ENDPOINT ON ACCOUNT TO ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
GRANT IMPORTED PRIVILEGES ON DATABASE snowflake TO ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;

// Grant CONTAINER_USER_ROLE to ACCOUNTADMIN
grant role CONTAINER_USER_ROLE to role ACCOUNTADMIN;

// Create Database, Warehouse, and Image spec stage
USE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
CREATE OR REPLACE DATABASE CONTAINER_HOL_DB;

CREATE OR REPLACE WAREHOUSE CONTAINER_HOL_WH
  WAREHOUSE_SIZE = XSMALL
  AUTO_SUSPEND = 120
  AUTO_RESUME = TRUE;
  
CREATE STAGE IF NOT EXISTS specs
ENCRYPTION = (TYPE='SNOWFLAKE_SSE');

CREATE STAGE IF NOT EXISTS volumes
ENCRYPTION = (TYPE='SNOWFLAKE_SSE')
DIRECTORY = (ENABLE = TRUE);

Run the following SQL commands in 01_snowpark_container_services_setup.sql using the Snowflake VSCode Extension OR in a SQL worksheet to create the OAuth Security Integration, External Access Integration our first compute pool, and our image repository

USE ROLE ACCOUNTADMIN;
CREATE SECURITY INTEGRATION IF NOT EXISTS snowservices_ingress_oauth
  TYPE=oauth
  OAUTH_CLIENT=snowservices_ingress
  ENABLED=true;

CREATE OR REPLACE NETWORK RULE ALLOW_ALL_RULE
  TYPE = 'HOST_PORT'
  MODE = 'EGRESS'
  VALUES_LIST= ('0.0.0.0:443', '0.0.0.0:80');

CREATE EXTERNAL ACCESS INTEGRATION ALLOW_ALL_EAI
  ALLOWED_NETWORK_RULES = (ALLOW_ALL_RULE)
  ENABLED = true;

GRANT USAGE ON INTEGRATION ALLOW_ALL_EAI TO ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;

USE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
CREATE COMPUTE POOL IF NOT EXISTS CONTAINER_HOL_POOL
MIN_NODES = 1
MAX_NODES = 1
INSTANCE_FAMILY = standard_1;

CREATE IMAGE REPOSITORY CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.IMAGE_REPO;

SHOW IMAGE REPOSITORIES IN SCHEMA CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC;

Python Virtual Environment and SnowCLI

Build and Test the Image Locally

The first service we are going to create is a hosted Jupyter notebook service. First, we will build and test the image locally. In the code repo, there is a ./src/jupyter-snowpark/dockerfile with the following contents:

FROM python:3.9
LABEL author=""

#Install packages & python base
RUN apt-get update && \
    apt-get install -y python3-pip

RUN pip3 install JPype1 jupyter pandas numpy seaborn scipy matplotlib seaborn pyNetLogo SALib "snowflake-snowpark-python[pandas]" snowflake-connector-python

#Create a new user for the notebook server , NB RUN instrcution are only ever executed during the buid
RUN useradd -ms /bin/bash jupyter   

#set the user and working directory 
USER jupyter
WORKDIR /home/jupyter 

#other system settings
EXPOSE 8888   

#launch jupyter notebook server. NOTE!  ENTRYPOINT ( or CMD )intrscutions run each time a container is launched!
ENTRYPOINT ["jupyter", "notebook","--allow-root","--ip=0.0.0.0","--port=8888","--no-browser" , "--NotebookApp.token=''", "--NotebookApp.password=''"] 

This is just a normal Dockerfile, where we install some packages, change our working directory, expose a port, and then launch our notebook service. There's nothing unique to Snowpark Container Services here!

Let's build and test the image locally from the terminal. Note it is a best practice to tag your local images with a

local_repository

prefix. Often, users will set this to a combination of first initial and last name, e.g. jsmith/my-image:latest. Navigate to your local clone of .../snowpark-container-services-101-quickstart/src/jupyter-snowpark and run a Docker build command:

cd .../snowpark-container-services-101-quickstart/src/jupyter-snowpark
docker build --platform=linux/amd64 -t <local_repository>/python-jupyter-snowpark:latest .

Verify the image built successfully:

docker image list

Now that our local image has built, let's validate that it runs successfully. From a terminal run:

docker run -d -p 8888:8888 <local_repository>/python-jupyter-snowpark:latest

Open up a browser and navigate to localhost:8888/lab to verify your notebook service is working locally. Once you've verified that the service is working, you can stop the container: docker stop python-jupyter-snowpark.

Tag and Push the Image

Now that we have a local version of our container working, we need to push it to Snowflake so that a Service can access the image. To do this we will create a new tag of the image that points at our image repository in our Snowflake account, and then push said tagged image. From a terminal, run the following:

  # e.g. if repository_url = org-account.registry.snowflakecomputing.com/container_hol_db/public/image_repo, snowflake_registry_hostname = org-account.registry.snowflakecomputing.com
  docker login <snowflake_registry_hostname> -u <user_name>
  > prompt for password
  docker tag <local_repository>/python-jupyter-snowpark:latest <repository_url>/python-jupyter-snowpark:dev

Note the difference between REPOSITORY_URL (org-account.registry.snowflakecomputing.com/container_hol_db/public/image_repo) and SNOWFLAKE_REGISTRY_HOSTNAME (org-account.registry.snowflakecomputing.com)

Verify that the new tagged image exists by running:

docker image list

Now, we need to push our image to Snowflake. From the terminal:

docker push <repository_url>/python-jupyter-snowpark:dev

This may take some time, so you can move on to the next step Configure and Push the Spec YAML while the image is being pushed. Once the docker push command completes, you can verify that the image exists in your Snowflake Image Repository by running the following SQL using the Snowflake VSCode Extension or SQL worksheet:

USE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
CALL SYSTEM$REGISTRY_LIST_IMAGES('/CONTAINER_HOL_DB/PUBLIC/IMAGE_REPO');

You should see your python-jupyter-snowpark image listed.

Configure and Push the Spec YAML

Services in Snowpark Container Services are defined using YAML files. These YAML files configure all of the various parameters, etc. needed to run the containers within your Snowflake account. These YAMLs support a large number of configurable parameter, although we will not reference all of them here. Navigate to your local clone of .../snowpark-container-services-101-quickstart/src/jupyter-snowpark/jupyter-snowpark.yaml, which should look like this:

spec:
  containers:
    - name: jupyter-snowpark
      image: <repository_hostname>/container_hol_db/public/image_repo/python-jupyter-snowpark:dev
      volumeMounts:
        - name: jupyter-home
          mountPath: /home/jupyter
  endpoints:
    - name: jupyter-snowpark
      port: 8888
      public: true
  volumes:
    - name: jupyter-home
      source: "@volumes/jupyter-snowpark"
      uid: 1000
      gid: 1000

Update the <repository_hostname> for your image and save the file. Now that the spec file is updated, we need to push it to our Snowflake Stage so that we can reference it next in our create service statement. We will use snowcli to push the yaml file. From the terminal:

cd .../snowpark-container-services-101-quickstart/src/jupyter-snowpark
snow object stage copy ./jupyter-snowpark.yaml @specs --overwrite --connection CONTAINER_hol

You can verify that your yaml was pushed successfully by running the following SQL using the Snowflake VSCode Extension or a SQL worksheet and verifying that the file is listed:

USE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
LS @CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.SPECS;

Create and Test the Service

Once we have successfully pushed our image and our spec YAML, we have all of the components uploaded to Snowflake that we need in order to create our service. There are three components required to create the service: a service name, a compute pool the service will run on, and the spec file that defines the service. Run the following SQL to create our Jupyter service:

use role CONTAINER_user_role;
create service CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.jupyter_snowpark_service
    in compute pool CONTAINER_HOL_POOL
    from @specs
    specification_file='jupyter-snowpark.yaml'
    external_access_integrations = (ALLOW_ALL_EAI);

Run CALL SYSTEM$GET_SERVICE_STATUS('CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.JUPYTER_SNOWPARK_SERVICE'); to verify that the service is successfully running. These commands are also spelled out in 02_jupyter_service.sql.

Since we specified that the jupyter-snowpark endpoint running on port 8888 would be public: true in our spec YAML, Snowflake is going to generate a URL for our service that can be used to access the service via our Web Browser. To get the URL, once the service is successfully in a RUNNING state, execute the following:

SHOW ENDPOINTS IN SERVICE JUPYTER_SNOWPARK_SERVICE;

Copy the jupyter-snowpark endpoint URL, and paste it in your browser. You will be asked to login to Snowflake via your username and password, after which you should successfully see your Jupyter instance running, all inside of Snowflake! Note, to access the service the user logging in must have the CONTAINER_USER_ROLE AND their default role cannot be ACCOUNTADMIN, SECURITYADMIN, or ORGADMIN.

Upload and Modify a Jupyter Notebook

Notice that in our spec YAML file we mounted the @volumes/jupyter-snowpark internal stage location to our /home/jupyter directory inside of our running container. What this means is that we will use our internal stage @volumes to persist and store artifacts from our container. If you go check out the @volumes stage in Snowsight, you'll see that when we created our jupyter_snowpark_service, a folder was created in our stage: @volumes/jupyter-snowpark

Stage Volume Mount

Now, any file that is uploaded to @volumes/jupyter-snowpark will be available inside of our container in the /home/jupyter directory, and vice versa. Read more about volume mounts in the documentation. To test this out, let's upload the sample Jupyter notebook that is in our source code repo at .../snowpark-container-services-101-quickstart/src/jupyter-snowpark/sample_notebook.ipynb. To do this you can either

OR

OR

What we've done is now created a Jupyter notebook which we can modify in our service, and the changes will be persisted in the file because it is using a stage-backed volume. Let's take a look at the contents of our sample_notebook.ipynb. Open up the notebook in your Jupyter service:

Jupyter Notebook

We want to pay special attention to the contents of the get_login_token() function:

def get_login_token():
    with open('/snowflake/session/token', 'r') as f:
        return f.read()

When you start a service or a job, Snowflake provides credentials to the running containers in the form of an oauth token located at /snowflake/session/token, enabling your container code to use Snowflake connectors for connecting to Snowflake and executing SQL (similar to any other code on your computer connecting to Snowflake). The provided credentials authenticate as the service role. Snowflake provides some of the information as environment variables in your containers.

Every object in Snowflake has an owner role. In the case of a service or job, Snowflake has a concept called a service role (this term applies to both services and jobs). The service role determines what capabilities your service is allowed to perform when interacting with Snowflake. This includes executing SQL, accessing stages, and service-to-service networking.

We configure the Snowpark Python Client to connect to our Snowflake account and execute SQL using this oauth token:

connection_parameters = {
    "account": os.getenv('SNOWFLAKE_ACCOUNT'),
    "host": os.getenv('SNOWFLAKE_HOST'),
    "token": get_login_token(),
    "authenticator": "oauth",
    "database": "CONTAINER_HOL_DB",
    "schema": "PUBLIC",
    "warehouse": "CONTAINER_HOL_WH"
}

Now we can run a sample query using our Snowpark session!

We've successfully built and deployed our Jupyter Notebook service. Now let's move on to a REST API which we will interact with using a Service Function.

Build and Test the Image Locally

The next service we are going to create is a simple REST API that takes in Celsius temperatures and converts them to Fahrenheit- a trivial example. First, we will build and test the image locally. In the code repo, there is a ./src/convert-api/dockerfile with the following contents:

FROM python:3.11

# Copy the packages file into the build
WORKDIR /app
COPY ./ /app/

# run the install using the packages manifest file
RUN pip install --no-cache-dir -r requirements.txt

# Open port 9090
EXPOSE 9090

# When the container launches run the flask app
ENV FLASK_APP="convert-app.py"
CMD ["flask", "run", "--host=0.0.0.0", "--port=9090"]

This is just a normal Dockerfile, where we install some packages, change our working directory, expose a port, and then launch our REST API. Our REST API is defined in ./src/convert-api/convert-app.py:

from flask import Flask, request, jsonify

app = Flask(__name__)

# The function to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit
def celsius_to_fahrenheit(celsius):
    return celsius * 9./5 + 32

@app.route('/convert', methods=['POST'])
def convert():
    # Get JSON data from request
    data = request.get_json()

    # Check if the 'data' key exists in the received JSON
    if 'data' not in data:
        return jsonify({'error': 'Missing data key in request'}), 400

    # Extract the 'data' list from the received JSON
    data_list = data['data']

    # Initialize a list to store converted values
    converted_data = []

    # Iterate over each item in 'data_list'
    for item in data_list:
        # Check if the item is a list with at least two elements
        if not isinstance(item, list) or len(item) < 2:
            return jsonify({'error': 'Invalid data format'}), 400
        
        # Extract the Celsius value
        celsius = item[1]
        
        # Convert to Fahrenheit and append to 'converted_data'
        converted_data.append([item[0], celsius_to_fahrenheit(celsius)])

    # Return the converted data as JSON
    return jsonify({'data': converted_data})

if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run(debug=True)

The only thing unique to Snowflake about this container, is that the REST API code expects to receive requests in the format that Snowflake External Function calls are packaged, and must also package the response in the expected format so that we can use it as a Service Function. Note this is only required if you intend to interact with the API via a SQL function.

Let's build and test the image locally from the terminal. **Note it is a best practice to tag your local images with a local_repository prefix. Often, users will set this to a combination of first initial and last name, e.g. jsmith/my-image:latest. Navigate to your local clone of .../snowpark-container-services-101-quickstart/src/convert-api and run a Docker build command:

cd .../snowpark-container-services-101-quickstart/src/convert-api
docker build --platform=linux/amd64 -t <local_repository>/convert-api:latest .

Verify the image built successfully:

docker image list

Now that our local image has built, let's validate that it runs successfully. From a terminal run:

docker run -d -p 9090:9090 <local_repository>/convert-api:latest

Test our local container endpoint by running the following from a different terminal window:

curl -X POST -H "Content-Type: application/json" -d '{"data": [[0, 12],[1,19],[2,18],[3,23]]}' http://localhost:9090/convert

You should recieve back a JSON object, this will conatin the batch id and then the converted value in Fahrenheit:

{"data":[[0,53.6],[1,66.2],[2,64.4],[3,73.4]]}

Once you've verified that the service is working, you can stop the container: docker stop convert-api.

Tag and Push the Image

Now that we have a local version of our container working, we need to push it to Snowflake so that a Service can access the image. To do this we will create a new tag of the image that points at our image repository in our Snowflake account, and then push said tagged image. From a terminal, run the following:

  # e.g. if repository_url = org-account.registry.snowflakecomputing.com/container_hol_db/public/image_repo, snowflake_registry_hostname = org-account.registry.snowflakecomputing.com
  docker login <snowflake_registry_hostname> -u <user_name>
  > prompt for password
  docker tag <local_repository>/convert-api:latest <repository_url>/convert-api:dev

Note the difference between

REPOSITORY_URL

(

org-account.registry.snowflakecomputing.com/container_hol_db/public/image_repo

) and

SNOWFLAKE_REGISTRY_HOSTNAME

(

org-account.registry.snowflakecomputing.com

)

Verify that the new tagged image exists by running:

docker image list

Now, we need to push our image to Snowflake. From the terminal:

docker push <repository_url>/convert-api:dev

This may take some time, so you can move on to the next step Configure and Push the Spec YAML while the image is being pushed. Once the docker push command completes, you can verify that the image exists in your Snowflake Image Repository by running the following SQL using the Snowflake VSCode Extension or SQL worksheet:

USE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
CALL SYSTEM$REGISTRY_LIST_IMAGES('/CONTAINER_HOL_DB/PUBLIC/IMAGE_REPO');

You should see your convert-api image listed.

Configure and Push the Spec YAML

Services in Snowpark Container Services are defined using YAML files. These YAML files configure all of the various parameters, etc. needed to run the containers within your Snowflake account. These YAMLs support a large number of configurable parameter, although we will not reference all of them here. Navigate to your local clone of .../snowpark-container-services-101-quickstart/src/convert-api/convert-api.yaml, which should look like this:

spec:
  containers:
    - name: convert-api
      image: <repository_hostname>/container_hol_db/public/image_repo/convert-api:dev
  endpoints:
    - name: convert-api
      port: 9090
      public: true

Update the

for your image and save the file. Now that the spec file is updated, we need to push it to our Snowflake Stage so that we can reference it next in our create service statement. We will use snowcli to push the yaml file. From the terminal:

cd .../snowpark-container-services-101-quickstart/src/convert-api
snow object stage copy ./convert-api.yaml @specs --overwrite --connection CONTAINER_hol

You can verify that your yaml was pushed successfully by running the following SQL using the Snowflake VSCode Extension or a SQL worksheet and verifying that the file is listed:

USE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
LS @CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.SPECS;

Create and Test the Service

Once we have successfully pushed our image and our spec YAML, we have all of the components uploaded to Snowflake that we need in order to create our service. There are three components required to create the service: a service name, a compute pool the service will run on, and the spec file that defines the service. Run the following SQL to create our Jupyter service:

use role CONTAINER_user_role;
create service CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.convert_api
    in compute pool CONTAINER_HOL_POOL
    from @specs
    specification_file='convert-api.yaml'
    external_access_integrations = (ALLOW_ALL_EAI);

Run CALL SYSTEM$GET_SERVICE_STATUS('CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.CONVERT-API'); to verify that the service is successfully running. These commands are also listed in 03_rest_service.sql

Create and Test the Service Function

Once the service is up and running, we will create a Service Function that allows us to call our REST API's function via SQL. First, let's create a table with some sample weather data in it:

USE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
USE DATABASE CONTAINER_HOL_DB;
USE SCHEMA PUBLIC;
USE WAREHOUSE CONTAINER_HOL_WH;

CREATE OR REPLACE TABLE WEATHER (
    DATE DATE,
    LOCATION VARCHAR,
    TEMP_C NUMBER,
    TEMP_F NUMBER
);

INSERT INTO weather (DATE, LOCATION, TEMP_C, TEMP_F) 
    VALUES 
        ('2023-03-21', 'London', 15, NULL),
        ('2023-07-13', 'Manchester', 20, NULL),
        ('2023-05-09', 'Liverpool', 17, NULL),
        ('2023-09-17', 'Cambridge', 19, NULL),
        ('2023-11-02', 'Oxford', 13, NULL),
        ('2023-01-25', 'Birmingham', 11, NULL),
        ('2023-08-30', 'Newcastle', 21, NULL),
        ('2023-06-15', 'Bristol', 16, NULL),
        ('2023-04-07', 'Leeds', 18, NULL),
        ('2023-10-23', 'Southampton', 12, NULL);

Now, let's create a function that specifies our convert-api service's convert-api endpoint:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION convert_udf (input float)
RETURNS float
SERVICE=CONVERT_API      //Snowpark Container Service name
ENDPOINT='convert-api'   //The endpoint within the container
MAX_BATCH_ROWS=5         //limit the size of the batch
AS '/convert';           //The API endpoint

We can now test our function:

SELECT convert_udf(12) as conversion_result;

And even update our table to populate the TEMP_F field using our Service Function:

UPDATE WEATHER
SET TEMP_F = convert_udf(TEMP_C);

SELECT * FROM WEATHER;

(Optional) Call the Convert Temperature Service Function from our Jupyter Notebook Service

Open up our previously created Jupyter Notebook service and open up our sample_notebook.ipynb. Copy and paste the following code into a new cell at the bottom of the notebook:

df = session.table('weather')
df = df.with_column("TEMP_F_SNOWPARK", F.call_udf('convert_udf', df['TEMP_C']))
df.show()

Run the cell, and you should see the following output dataframe, with our new column TEMP_F_SNOWPARK included:

----------------------------------------------------------------------
|"DATE"      |"LOCATION"   |"TEMP_C"  |"TEMP_F"  |"TEMP_F_SNOWPARK"  |
----------------------------------------------------------------------
|2023-03-21  |London       |15        |59        |59.0               |
|2023-07-13  |Manchester   |20        |68        |68.0               |
|2023-05-09  |Liverpool    |17        |63        |62.6               |
|2023-09-17  |Cambridge    |19        |66        |66.2               |
|2023-11-02  |Oxford       |13        |55        |55.4               |
|2023-01-25  |Birmingham   |11        |52        |51.8               |
|2023-08-30  |Newcastle    |21        |70        |69.8               |
|2023-06-15  |Bristol      |16        |61        |60.8               |
|2023-04-07  |Leeds        |18        |64        |64.4               |
|2023-10-23  |Southampton  |12        |54        |53.6               |
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Now, save the Jupyter notebook- when you come back to this service in the future, your new code will be saved because of our stage-backed volume mount!

There are a number of useful functions we should explore with respect to controlling the service itself from SQL. More information on SQL commands can be found at Snowpark Container Services SQL Commands and Snowpark Container Services System Functions

  1. Get the status of your container using CALL $SYSTEM:From a SQl console:
    CALL SYSTEM$GET_SERVICE_STATUS('CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.JUPYTER_SNOWPARK_SERVICE');
    
  2. Check the status of the logs with :From a SQl console:
    CALL SYSTEM$GET_SERVICE_LOGS('CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.JUPYTER_SNOWPARK_SERVICE', '0', 'jupyter-snowpark',10);
    
  3. Suspend your container using the ALTER SERVICE commandFrom a SQL console:
    ALTER SERVICE CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.JUPYTER_SNOWPARK_SERVICE SUSPEND ;
    
  4. Resume your container using the ALTER SERVICE command

From a SQL console:

ALTER SERVICE CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.JUPYTER_SNOWPARK_SERVICE RESUME ;

If you no longer need the services and compute pool up and running, we can stop the services and suspend the compute pool so that we don't incur any cost (Snowpark Container Services bill credits/second based on the compute pool's uptime, similar to Virtual Warehouse billing):

USE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
ALTER COMPUTE POOL CONTAINER_HOL_POOL STOP ALL;
ALTER COMPUTE POOL CONTAINER_HOL_POOL SUSPEND;

If you want to clean up and remove ALL of the objects you created during this quickstart, run the following from 04_cleanup.sql:

USE ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;
ALTER COMPUTE POOL CONTAINER_HOL_POOL STOP ALL;
ALTER COMPUTE POOL CONTAINER_HOL_POOL SUSPEND;

DROP SERVICE CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.JUPYTER_SNOWPARK_SERVICE;
DROP SERVICE CONTAINER_HOL_DB.PUBLIC.CONVERT_API;
DROP COMPUTE POOL CONTAINER_HOL_POOL;

DROP DATABASE CONTAINER_HOL_DB;
DROP WAREHOUSE CONTAINER_HOL_WH;

USE ROLE ACCOUNTADMIN;
DROP ROLE CONTAINER_USER_ROLE;

Congratulations, you have successfully completed this quickstart! Through this quickstart, we were able to create and manage long-running services using Snowflake's managed Snowpark Container Services. These services run entirely within your Snowflake account boundary using a managed container orchestration service- keeping your data secure, and making development to deployment incredibly easy.

For more information, check out the resources below:

Related Resources